Surveillant Architectures

Developing paradigms in media culture. This blog is collaboratively edited by the Surveillant Architectures Group.

Anti-Facial Recognition strategies defeated


We had some fun at my ‘Raumkontrolle’ block seminar, trying out our Netavis Observer ‘face recognition’ software on various anti-Anti-Facial Recognition strategies. Seems they all used the same (Open-CV?) algorithm, and while I’m sure these strategies work against that, our (not very reliable) software looked right through the make-up and noise-glasses.

First test:  CV Dazzle project. The artist says the make-up and hairdo effectively stops software from recognizing faces. Let’s see… we pointed our IP-cam at a computer screen, the easiest way to get images from one system into another.

 

CV-Dazzle make-up working as expected. The bottom row of faces is not recognized.

Netavis-screen-photos-13

Same here.

 

Netavis-screen-photos-12

Oops. The algorithm got gender and age wrong, but hey. Not too bad!

Seems to be learning as we go.

It also seems to be learning as we go.

Next test: Isao Echizen’s modified sun glasses:

Screen shot 2013-01-23 at 21.54.05

The project is called “Privacy Protection Techniques Using Differences in Human and Device Sensitivity”. If I understand it correctly, infra-red light (invisible to the human eye) in the eye-to-nose bridge region in the face is meant to irritate face recognition algorithms.

Again, we pointed our IP-cam at a computer screen.

Netavis-screen-photos-06

 

Bingo! Even if we take into account that a video of pink-ish light on a computer screen isn’t the same as actual IR light, it doesn’t seem to work too well…

 







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